Category Archives: indian removal

There is Nothing to Fear…

The dark-skinned people just don’t fit in.  They do not learn our languages and customs.  When they mix with us there is often violence.  They are not Christians. It is to the economic benefit of the country that they be … Continue reading

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Osceola Died Because He Refused Modern Medical Treatment

Osceola was captured under a flag of truce, then died while still in prison.  The physicians who saw him wanted everyone to know that they were not responsible for his death.  He died because he refused medical treatment.   From … Continue reading

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The History of the Butterfly, Part 127: Next Week’s Paper

The Niles National Register from the following week—November 18, 1837, carried news of a tragic accident. The steamboat Monmouth, operating by the Alabama Emigrating Company, sank in a terrible accident. Two hundred thirty four Creek Indians, on board because they … Continue reading

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The History of the Butterfly, Part 123: The Rivals Dance

Even while Indian Removal was in full force, the group of Indians that we are following—the “Confederated Sac and Fox” seemed more interested in their warfare and competition with the Sioux than they were with the policy of the U. … Continue reading

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The History of the Butterfly, Part 122: They Take John Ross’s House.

The October 8, 1836 issue of the Niles Weekly Register contains the following, under a title of “Scenes in the Cherokee country.” “Mr John Ross, the principal chief of the Cherokee nation, was at Washington city on the business of … Continue reading

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